Your Alter Ego

Steve Arterburn

Did you know that service is a way of saying thanks to God?  You can never truly pay back the overwhelming love and support your parents may have shown you.  But you can pass the love on to your children.  In the same way, you can never repay God for granting you life in Christ and for blessing you, but you can pass his love onto others in practical ways.

One of the great barriers to service, however, is pride.  Pride causes men to scoff at the thought of putting others first.  Pride teaches you to calculate how every action will further your own reputation or advance you toward your goals.  Pride makes you keep careful record of who is next in line for something good.

The apostle Paul had much to say to us about sacrifice.  Chapter twelve of the book of Romans portrays several specific areas in which you can be a living sacrifice and serve God in the world.  As a living sacrifice, you surrender using your gifts solely for your own advancement.  You seek to bless others instead and sacrifice your time and resources for their benefit.  In the process, your life will be shaped into the image of greatest man who ever lived:  Jesus Christ.  Where do you sense God calling you to serve?  Let your motivation for service flow from a heart that’s thankful to God for the grace he’s shown you.

Reaching Back with Repentance

Steve Arterburn

 

 

Most Americans admire those who practice ‘rugged individualism.’ But in our emphasis on individual freedom, we often lose sight of our corporate responsibility. As Christians, we’re individuals but we’re also part of a people. We’re called to benefit from the work of others, to suffer with others, and to bear responsibility with others. This may not seem fair, but it’s a fact.

 

You see, our ties reach all the way back to Adam and Eve. We need to be saved because, as it says in the book of Romans, ‘Adam’s one sin brought condemnation upon everyone.’ But Roman’s goes on to say that this very principle of corporate connectedness makes salvation possible through our unity with Christ, for ‘Christ’s one act of righteousness makes all people right in God’s sight and gives them life’.

 

When the Israelites returned from their exile, they realized how both they and their ancestors had failed God’s commands, and they were overcome with grief. In that repentant grief, however, they heard the good news of grace, and this revived and renewed their love for God and their desire to obey him.

 

Ask God to bring to mind any sins or wrongdoings you, or even your family, has committed so you may confess and let go of them. It’s a powerful exercise, but seeing God’s mercy over all your sin can be one of the most liberating experiences ever.