Solomon

Steve Arterburn

Americans have traditionally valued a strong work ethic.  We believe the harder we work, the greater our chances for success.  But if unchecked, you can get carried away and you’ll end up devoting all your time to work and lose the balance that allows you to grow spiritually. Are you sacrificing healthy, family relationships, connections, friendships, and your walk with God so you can achieve more and advance in your profession? Perhaps you can relate to Solomon. When he became king of Israel, he asked God to grant him wisdom. Pleased at this request, God gave this young king honor, wealth, and a long life, in addition to wisdom.  

Then Solomon started building the Temple.  He built his palace and fortified his country against intruders.  All of these projects were done on an enormous scale, even by today’s standards.  In order to accomplish these tasks, Solomon sacrificed important relationships with his people, with his family, and with his God.  He taxed his people heavily and required them to work hard on his building projects.  He failed to teach his son how to use wisdom to rule the people.  He also stopped listening to God and disobeyed him by marrying numerous pagan women and by worshipping their so-called gods.

It’s easy to lose yourself in work and achievements and to forget the source of your strength and success.  Whenever anything in your priorities of life is placed above God, it’s time to stop and rethink just what your priorities need to be.

Joy In God’s Presence

Steve Arterburn

Do you spend time praying to God, singing praises to him, and bowing before him?

Do you feel too macho or to proud to bow or sing to God? If that’s the case then look with me at a real man in the Bible. The psalms of King David are songs that still give us direction and hope. David was a man who knew his own sinfulness yet was able to sing to God.

God wants you to know you are welcome and valued. The joy you find thinking about and experiencing God each day will help you stay tuned in to his desire for you.

Worship and prayer will remind you of how great and holy God is. You’ll gain a new appreciation for how gracious God is to forgive you and allow you into his presence.

Relinquishing the Debts Owed Us

Steve Arterburn

Do you tend to keep a mental list of all the wrongs that have been done against you’an accounting of what you think others owe you? You may feel they owe you an apology, a favor, a sum of money, or something else. If every time you’re hurt, you’re mentally adding to the ledger of debt that others owe you, I want to help you see how and why to let go and erase that ledger of debt.

Jesus told this story to address what I’m talking about: ‘A king’decided to bring his accounts up to date’In the process, one of his debtors was brought in who owed him millions of dollars.’ The man begged for forgiveness. ‘Then the king was filled with pity for him, and he released him and forgave his debt. But when the man left the king, he went to a fellow servant who owed him a few thousand dollars. He grabbed him by the throat and demanded instant payment.’ This was reported to the king. ‘Then the king called in the man he’d forgiven and said, ‘You evil servant. I forgave you that tremendous debt because you pleaded with me. Shouldn’t you have mercy on your fellow servant, just as I had mercy on you?” (Matthew 18:23-35).

When you look at the enormous moral debt God has forgiven you and the price Jesus paid for us to be forgiven, you should be compelled to forgive others. Forgiveness will free you from the torture of festering resentment. You can’t change what others have done to you, but you can write off their debts by handing the accounting process over to God.